Website: Sounds2Buy - Music from Independent and Unsigned artists

A new professional platform for unsigned bands and musicians to sell and promote their music has been launched at Sounds2Buy.com.

Musicians are using the site to expand their current audiences and to sell their songs online, offering the rare opportunity to make some cash from their art. In addition to this service, Sounds2Buy.com includes a range of other useful services for up-and-coming bands and artists, including:

* Merchandising areas where users can design their own t-shirts before selling them on the site

* A review section that allows musicians and listeners to leave feedback on each other's music potentially boosting their profile through recommendation for a front-page feature

* A range of articles aimed at people in the music business, offering guidance and advice on making it as a commercial success

Although a huge number of firms claim to offer the world to young musicians, Sounds2Buy.com has a new slant in that it provides a straightforward way for bands and musicians to actually sell their music to paying and willing audiences for cash.

The website prides itself on being user-friendly and seems to be an effective way for new musicians to enhance their public profile.

Interestingly, the site has a partner radio station, Ore Stone Radio, which plays submitted music from the site, providing another route to notoriety for hopefuls.

The site's founder, Ben Rivaux explains that there are three types of accounts open to new users: "the first type of account is free and lets users upload one video and as many as five of their tracks for streaming, so artists can start building a fan base straightaway.

"The second is a Premium account that costs 15 for 12 months and lets users sell up to 12 tracks, and the third also a Premium account costs 30 for 12 months and gives artists the option of selling up to 24 tracks, he explains.

Devoted music fan Benoit says he came up with the idea for the site after growing frustrated with big companies making huge profits from artists. He claims he is aiming to put song royalties back where they belong: in the pockets of the musicians who created them.